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Emancipatory Journalism

“A Threat To This Day” Jared Ball on the Distortion and Erasure of Black Revolutionaries in Corporate Media

*Published Originally July 10, 2022

In this episode Dr. Jared Ball returns to the podcast. Jared Ball is a professor of communication studies at Morgan State University. He is the author of The Myth and Propaganda of Black Buying Power and I Mix What I Like!: A Mixtape Manifesto and he is the co-editor along with Dr. Todd Steven Burroughs of the book A Lie Of Reinvention: Correcting Manning Marable’s Malcolm X

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5 thoughts on ““A Threat To This Day” Jared Ball on the Distortion and Erasure of Black Revolutionaries in Corporate Media

  1. You are correct in your comments. But why is it that you are so afraid the criticize bell hooks who wrote books denigrating black revolutionaries. Basically accusing those involved with Black power as being serial misogynist and saying that the implication of Black power stopped Black progress because ot implied violence. At the same time she clearly expresses that with one or two exceptions the only masculinities she respects are those demonstrated by a few gay guys. I seriously want to know why is it that you and others seem to be so terrified of criticizing this woman’s work.

    1. You’ve followed me here with this same question? Why? Why is it necessary to still criticize a dead sister who was not perfect but is certainly not still here spreading horrific economic and historical analyses. Why are you so afraid of these men being shown to be wrong in their actual lifetime? What scares you so much Marcus? There is simply no way would could give my body of work an honest assessment and conclude i am “scared” and “terrified” of anything. The damage of Black Capitalist analysis far outweighs any mistakes made by hooks. If this answer doesn’t suffice for you go and review my entire body of work, its all here on this website. Spend a few thousands hours catching up and then if you are still unsatisfied unsubscribe (you are subscribed right? you certainly aren’t scared of subscribing are you?) and go publish your critique of hooks and my work or just go on and be peaceful making good contributions to a better world. You are doing that right? Your comments read and fearful, as if you are scared of the world, and of criticism of men with horrible analyses who are ripping off their people. Are you afraid to challenge living men who are hustling their people? Are you more willing to call out dead women? That is how these multiple attempts to reach me with this question read. Don’t be scared Marcus, organize, as Dhoruba has said. And hooks cannot hurt you any more. She is gone. Peace.

      1. My concern is why you and others are afraid to call out the narrative that Black men are all rapists. Why you can spend time addressing the nuances of Josephs writing on Carmichael but feel compelled to give deference to someone who clearly savaged George Jackson, who you seem to admire. My question is why is it that the same critic is not made of some so-called black feminist savaging of the Black Power movement. While they may give lip service to socialism in some form they always seem to retreat to let’ all get along. Selling the idea, the radical postures of Kwame Ture, George Jackson and others derailed the movement is ridiculous, and adds to the misunderstanding of the era. If Joseph had taken that position, you would have been all over him. I just want to know why?
        You do a good job in much of your commentary, although I think you over sell the anti-Black buying power narrative. Do you think we should not participate in the economy? But if you are so hard on that narrative, if you feel compelled to attack a brother who criticizes people for promoting non-voting, why are you so mild on someone who attacks the very essence of Black radicalism. The Black feminist narrative is fomenting division that may not be able to be prepared.
        I am not afraid of hooks, but I am afraid of the division that will arise because of her false narratives.
        But idf your answer is that you agree with hooks. That is what it is.

        1. Your entire premise is wrong and disrespects the amount of work i alone have provided here (never mind my comrades). You are commenting off of what is clearly ONE video you’ve watched. I mean, where is all this attention ive ever paid to hooks, when did i say i agreed with her on these issues? I have never said anything close to that. And do you know anyone who has produced more media about George Jackson than me? Can you come up with even one name that rivals my Jackson output? i know you cant. But instead of praising all my excellent work you want to come here (again) to criticize me for what i havent said or done? This is silly. You have clearly paid no real attention to my work and have the nerve to rant at me repeatedly offering no evidence of your own positive contribution or recognition of my decades of documented positive contributions. So, for my last word on this, ill encourage you to start on this website with all the Tommy Curry interviews and go from there. Once you do that, that is, put in some work in assessing my work, then come back here and on Youtube with your apologies which should be as loud as these unfair and ridiculously narrow/wrong critiques. But im done with you and this absurdity, you haven’t even earned the right to receive these responses. So for them and the forthcoming apology and debt of gratitude you owe my work, ill just leave you with a “you’re welcome” and keep it moving.

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