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The False Equivalence of Armed Conflict

The False Equivalence of Armed Conflict

Dhoruba bin-Wahad, formerly of the Black Panther Party and Black Liberation Army, joined us once again to assess media distortions of armed struggle.  We discussed the history of the Black Liberation Army, armed struggle, media narratives regarding violence, plus praise of and advice for #BlackLivesMatter and related activists.

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  1. “It may sound like a cliche’, but it seems that society manufactures both the poor and its criminal element”[ Judge Bruce Wright: author of Black Robes- White Justice]. Marvin Gaye, the inimitable singer, songwriter once voiced these lyrics in one of his most popular songs– Inner City Blues: “crime is increasing, trigger happy policing.” Mr. Dhoruba bin- Wahad is correct when he states— “The police are agents of the state who protect and serve the oligarchy. They’re also anti democratic and help to control colonial enclaves[ inner cities]. The police also have their genesis in slave catching patrols. Wahad says we must defend our communities from these racist attacks. Self- defense has always been one of our modus operandi when dealing with insidious racism in these yet to be United States of America. Listen to an ancestor, Robert F. Williams, a civil and human rights leader who in 1959 advocated armed resistance to racial oppression: “That there is no law here[ Monroe,Louisiana], there is no need to take the white attackers to the courts because they will go free and that the federal government is not coming to the aid of people who are oppressed and its time for Negro men to stand up and be men and if its necessary for us to die we must be willing to die. If it is necessary for us to kill we must be willing to kill”. Angry about the police murders of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge,LA., and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, military veterans Gavin Long and Micah Johnson heeded the call of Robert F. Williams and Jamaican poet, Claude Mckay [ If We Must Die ] !

  2. Dhoruba always makes strong points. Dr. Ball, you asked Dhoruba to talk on the origins/history of the BLA, unless I missed it, I didn’t hear it. I would like Dhoruba to discuss BLA soldier Twyman Meyers & his role in the guerilla movement. Thanks for posting pictures of Mark Essex & Robert Charles, there’s not enough conversation on history & actions of these brothers.

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